How stress affects our nervous system – with Finding Inner Safety author Dr Nerina Ramlakhan

A stressful situation — whether something environmental, such as a looming work deadline, or psychological, such as persistent worry about losing a job — can trigger a cascade of stress hormones that produce well-orchestrated physiological changes. A stressful incident can make the heart pound and breathing quicken. Muscles tense and beads of sweat appear.

Over the years, researchers have learned not only how and why these reactions occur, but have also gained insight into the long-term effects chronic stress has on physical and psychological health. Over time, repeated activation of the stress response takes a toll on the body. 

So what affect does stress have on our nervous system, and what can we do about it?

Thanks to the following guests for participating:

Dr Nerina Ramlakhan has worked as a physiologist and sleep expert for 25 years. She spent a decade conducting sleep and wellness programmes at the Capio Nightingale Hospital in London, coaches on burnout prevention at Ashridge Business School, and is the original founder of BUPA’s Corporate Wellbeing Solutions. Nerina works with individuals as well as numerous corporate clients from various industries including in sport such as at Chelsea Football Club and hosts a regular sleep programme at Vale de Moses yoga retreat, Portugal.

Nerina is the author of Tired But Wired; Fast Asleep, Wide Awake; and The Little Book of Sleep: The Art of Natural Sleep. Her work has been featured in The Times, The Telegraph, The Guardian, New Scientist, Psychologies, Red, and Healthy Living magazines and she has appeared on numerous national TV and radio programmes including This Morning, Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast, Sky News, and BBC Radio 2. Nerina is also a Stylist editorial contributor and gives her expert opinion for the Stylist Sleep Diaries, an ongoing weekly feature where readers can record their routines and receive her expert advice on their lifestyle and bedtime routines. Her new book is Finding Inner Safety.

Meditopia’s Head of Business Development Christine Taylor

Sylvia Tillmann, who is a certified Tension Releasing Exercises Provider at Tremendous Tre

Lauri Leadley, Founder & President at Valley Sleep Center

Susan B. Trachman, MD, who is a practicing psychiatrist with over 30 years of experience. She is also Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Virginia Commonwealth University and Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at George Washington University, where she teaches medical students, residents and post-residency fellows in psychiatry.

Here are some of the resources from the show:

At this workshop on November 15, 2012, Dr. Gabor Maté presented an in-depth analysis of vicarious trauma – including definitions, myths, and realities of trauma and vicarious trauma, as well as the sources and triggers for stress, its physiology, and how to release it.

Books looked at this week:

Dr Nerina Ramlakhan: Finding Inner Safety: The Key to Healing, Thriving, and Overcoming Burnout

Dr. Gabor Maté: When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress

PS. I do not receive commission for reviewing books and talks.

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Transcription

Published by suswatibasu

Suswati Basu is a writer, journalist, producer and feminist activist residing in London. She has written for the Guardian, Huffington Post and the F-Word blogs, and has worked for various media outlets such as the BBC, Channel 4 and for ITV News/ITN. She currently works as a senior intelligence expert.

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